Sunday, February 12, 2012

Bitter Beauty Blunders


Almost all of my beauty blunders can be directly attributed to one primary thing: IMPULSE.

Video, volo, emo*.

Any amount of would-be rationalization, no matter how small, rarely reaches my level of consciousness while I am making the purchase. I'm not saying this is wrong—I have a good job and spend my disposable income on what makes me happy. But that doesn't mean I don't make some really big blunders, despite the best intentions, and despite heeding some of the prevailing advice of the day. I should add that not all of my purchases make me happy; in fact, I sometimes experience buyer's remorse before the item even reaches my front door.

Here are some of my most noteworthy failures.

Brown eyeshadow
I have blue eyes. Blue + orange-brown = smashing, right? FAIL. Try as I might, I do not look good in brown eyeshadow, no matter what makeup artists would have me believe. Dirty and unwashed; that's my result, and I had the good sense NOT to buy MAC Rule. Still, I wish I could take back all the money I spent trying to find the right brown.

Biggest disappointment: Dior 5-Colour Eyeshadow in Iridescent Leather 539. Best brown for any eye color? Phhhhhht. Too warm, way too shimmery and all around yuck.


Sparkly, über shimmery eyeshadow
Sparkle just isn't my thing. Even as a much younger woman, I preferred matte and satin finishes and that's what I still prefer. A rut? I don't think so—I feel uncomfortable wearing makeup that looks like makeup (except for lipstick), always have, always will. I do like a moderately gleaming, satiny finish, which means I still try some of the new shimmer eyeshadows, only to be disappointed in how the finish looks on my lids. I'll read about them on blogs or in magazines and they look so gorgeous, but I should give it up and stick with what works, because very shimmery eyeshadows are just a waste of my money.

Memorable disappointments include Bobbi Brown Pewter #3 from the Fall 2010 Chrome collection and Rouge Bunny Rouge Abyssinian Catbird and Alabaster Starling eyeshadows. Beautiful colors to look at—on someone else.


Yellow foundation
I laugh at makeup brands that say—nay, insist—that all skin tones must wear yellow-based foundation. My skin has mauve undertones, and eons ago I was color printed at Prescriptives as Blue/Red. A recent seasonal color analysis confirmed my long-held suspicions as Summer (True/Cool, to be exact), where I finally understood that of all the skin tones in the world, I am one of a small minority whose skin does not look good with any added warmth. And yet makeup artists keep slapping yellow makeup on my face, and I occasionally buy it, thinking perhaps I got it wrong. I won't rush out to buy foundation that resembles a bottle of calamine lotion (Prescritptives Camellia, I see you winking at me), but I do try to steer toward neutral beige makeup with a slight pink base (like Make Up For Ever Face & Body #38 Pink Porcelain).

Recent (priciest) disappointment was Rouge Bunny Rouge Milk Aquarelle Liquid Foundation in Coconut Milk Parfait. Amazing finish in the wrong color. Whose fault is that? Mine! I got a sample first and still bought the full-sized bottle, hoping the sample had oxidized and that the real product would be the pale milky pink-beige, as described on the Zuneta web site. FAIL.


Bronzer
I tried. Even though I was not tempted by bronzer my entire adult life, my introduction to beauty blogs a few years ago made me wonder if I was missing something. In the last 2-3 years, I have tested or purchased Armani, Edward Bess, Guerlain, Chanel, Dior, Rouge Bunny Rouge, Physician's Formula, and probably many others I have forgotten.

As for the concept of bronze, just about everyone but the extremely pale can get at least a tiny tan, so tan is within my natural coloring ... somewhere. I used to like how my skin looked in summer (I lived near the beach), so my problem is not that a tan looks fake on me—it is trying to fake that sun-kissed color from a pan. I don't tan golden brown; I tan a rosy light brown, and that bronzer colors just does not appear to be sold anywhere.

Bronzer fail: Edward Bess Ultra Luminous Bronzer. It's an excellent product, but I should have known better. In fact, I now believe that some people are just not meant to fake a bronze. If we want one, we should go outside for 15 minutes.

Pigmented, matte red lipstick
In the 90s, when corporate women flocked to brown lipstick, I was still wearing red (my version of red via Prescriptives). In later years, I wholeheartedly embraced new-to-me brands, like Besame Cosmetics, Julie Hewett, and Lipstick Queen. But before that, I had incorporated my red lips into A Look, which I wore with very little other makeup besides groomed brows, mascara, and maybe a pale wash of greige eyeshadow. At work I'd wear a low, slightly-messy chignon and skirt or pant suits—more Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy than Gwen Stefani.


But my red lips betrayed me and became a beauty blunder. One day I was talking to a colleague, and I suddenly noticed he was talking to/staring at my lips. After, I took a good, long look at my not-20-year-old face in the mirror, I acknowledged that a retro, pinup-red mouth no longer suited the face I was walking around in today. But every time a new red lipstick hit the market I would swoon. I did this until a couple months ago, when my lips and I had a Come to Jesus moment. I accepted that red lipstick is perfectly fine, even flattering, as long as it is sheer, very much like my still oft-worn Laura Mercier Gel Lip Color in Sweet Cherry. ♥

Eyeshadow palettes
I would dearly love to bank all the money I have wasted on eyeshadow palettes. To be sure, they are pretty to look at, but nearly every eyeshadow palette I have ever purchased has had at least one dud color you couldn't even make my corpse wear. Every Dior quint, every Chanel quad, 75% of Chantecaille's Les Dauphins quad; 50% of Chantecaille Tiger in the Wild quad, Becca face/eye palettes, Bobbi Brown, Edward Bess, Laura Mercier, NARS, MAC, Guerlain, and the list goes on. The problem with palettes is the pairing of cool with warm or too much shimmer. I can't even list my biggest blunder because they were all blunders, and I surrender. Where I get the most value and happiness is from customizable palettes, a la Trish McEvoy, Laura Mercier, and Bobbi Brown. I wish more brands made this an option, but I have more eyeshadow than I will ever use up in this lifetime, so I suppose it doesn't matter.

As for my relationship with makeup in the future, I am now much more attuned to what colors and finishes are my most complementary, and I try to make more discerning purchases, but I still make mistakes.

Do you have any purchases that belong in the annals of beauty blunders?


Photo  credits, mostly Google images except for Edward Bess and the eyeshadow palette drawer,which are mine.

* Roughly (and badly) translated to "I see, I want, I buy."

45 comments:

  1. I'm hoping to be done with mass buying of blunders by the time I'm 35. :) I'm still in the experimental stage and allow for blunders when it comes to areas I'm not good at, like EYE SHADOWS. I think I've nailed the skincare and face makeup for sure, though.

    Zuzu, I'm convinced that you and I are the exact opposite in terms of colours. Cool tones look horrible absolutely horrible on me. Sometimes I go on the blogosphere in search of colour twins, which can be ever so helpful, but I think opposites can also be useful as well. I tried Bobbi Brown Galaxy cream shadow based on your post and it just did not work on me. That's when it hit me that we may be opposites.

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    1. Liz, I have skincare nailed down, too, and thank god! I'm at an age where I could really start to spend a lot, looking for the fountain of youth, but in that one area I am very satisfied with what I am using and am not interested in looking for anything new. That's one part of my routine where less is definitely more.

      I'm sorry if you bought something I loved and hated it--at least I hope you tried it and didn't buy it! I have definitely done that before; in fact, I bought items sight unseen that looked amazing in Sabrina's review (The Beauty Look Book), only to discover they weren't as great on me. (She can wear pale lipsticks.) After reading her blog for a while I learned more about her skin tone and preferences and realized I'd been lured in by her excellent writing and photographs. ☺ Now I read her blog primarily for the sheer pleasure of it.

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    2. Oh, I'm not blaming you at all! I tried it and it looked horrible, so I didn't buy it. The colour itself was gorgeous but doesn't go with my clearly yellow skin tone. :) I suppose we do often lead each other astray, but I've gotten quite good at being able to tell from swatches whether something would look good on me or not.

      Yeah, that Sabrina brings on the worst sort of lemmings, but I've also realized lately with the makeup bans that I don't have to have everything pretty that's out there. Your blog is one of the few that helps ground me!

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    3. Oh, that's so nice to hear! As for Galaxy, gorgeous in the pot, isn't it? but when I really examined how it looked on me, I realized it was no good. The warmth from the bronze shimmers is a problem for me. If only it was just grey with silver or blue microshimmers I'd be in heaven.

      Learning I am cool, not cool-neutral, has really helped refine my direction and my eye for product.

      And, yes! I don't have to have every pretty thing out there. I was thinking on the way to work this morning that my most beloved items is getting whittled down to a very small stash, indeed.

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  2. hmm...rosy brown bronzer -- have you tried benefit dallas?

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    1. I have, and it makes me look as flushed as a wino on a bender. I haven't tanned since 1992, so it looked like my relationship with bronzer has reached an impasse. :^)

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  3. Great post, as always :) I think beauty blunders for me include browns, as well. They are supposed to be flattering on every skin tone, but I really don't think so. Orangey browns often make me look dirty and muddy, as well, so I avoid them.

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    1. Agreed. I am drawn to Bobbi Brown's simple eyeshadow palettes with their subtle nuances, but there is just too much brown in everything she makes, including the lipsticks and blushes. I need clear ... or very slightly muted with grey.

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  4. Sing it sister! Your blog is fantastic. Even though we have such different coloring, I was nodding vigorously at each and every one of these.
    I am so grateful to you for crystalizing and clarifying the process of thinking intelligently about makeup, that I would send you all of my beauty blunders in gratitude.
    But they wouldn't suit you either, and the giant truck of costly, unwearable products would block the driveway, lol!
    To conclude, I'm really paring it down and gaining a grownup (finally) understanding om my own coloring and what works, in no small part thanks to these blog posts. Merci.

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    1. Hi, Anon, thanks! Your comment about sending me your stuff made me laugh. A friend and I often joke about the beep-beep-beep sound we'd hear from the 18-wheeler backing into our driveway to unload the goods. We used to send USPS flat rate boxes to one another full of stuff we'd grown tired or or which didn't work. We finally stopped when we noticed we were recycling cosmetics and previously swapped items were coming back to us!

      Lately I have been wanting to wear just two eyeshadows, what a relief. I can get ready in the morning so quickly now. Now if I can just stay in this happy place and resist the new stuff that comes out. I avoided NARS Lhasa only to be assaulted by a newer color (413 BLKR) that appears to be even more of that dusty lavender shade I love so much. *sigh*

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  5. Hear, hear! Yes, I'm with you on the palettes. I no longer permit myself to buy them, no matter how pretty they look. I *like* choosing individual colors to wear (or just one color, mostly). And as for bronzer-- it doesn't work, and I'm just not interested in finding one that does. So I completely ignore them.

    I don't want to become closed-minded and keep wearing the same makeup no matter how times change (I see lots of women in my city who look like they're stuck in the mid-80s), but I'm not subjecting myself to the same failures over and over again. It's all about texture and application techniques, rather than color these days, anyway.

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    1. Texture and application have come such a long way, hasn't they? I envy your small stash, Veuve, and I love how you appreciate each of your items and use them up, rarely buying something new until you need it. I view being highly selective as taking good care of yourself. That's the way I used to be, and I aim to get to that place of gratitude and deep content again.

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  6. Come to Jesus moment haha. You crack me up. I had one of those this week too. Less is more for me. I've finally realized that I look better with less makeup on. No heavy eyeshadows, and a glowy makeup base, a bit of bronzer and I look younger and healthier. As soon as I put too much makeup on I look older than 45.
    I am cool tones like you, but I lean more neutral. Speaking of I have MUFE Face and body in #38 that I've used twice. It's way too pale for me. I used to wear that shade, but now I can't. I should send it to you!

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    1. Why can't you wear it anymore, Tracy? Have you found that sun damage has darkened your skin (since we're the same generation--I assume we both baked in the sun in our 20s). It was a shock to me when I realized my skin didn't get pale in the winter anymore, and that my face was a darker color than my belly! I do still wear the lighter foundation, mostly because my neck and chest are lighter than my face, but that was such a freaky thing to recognize in myself! I burned/tanned one too many times.

      I always thought I was cool-neutral because of the mauve undertones and yellow overtones, but my color analysis showed me how wrong yellow was on my skin, even though it makes logical sense to match the overtones.

      As for your MUFE #38, please find another giftee or sell it!! The rate at which I finish any single product is slower than dial-up on a 28.8k modem. :D

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    2. Yes exactly! Sun damage. I used to be NW5-10 in MAC, but now I'm NW 15-20 I'm finding.
      When I had a glycolic peel, the esthetician told me that us more mature ladies hold on to sun colour longer than our younger counter parts too. It takes longer to fade on us which makes sense since our skin cells don't turn over and shed as fast. Bummer. But yeah, i put that foundation on and it just doesn't look right anymore.
      Btw, placed my RBR order finally!! Thanks for your recs!

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    3. Holding onto color is so true. I am sure we've all seen that extremely dark older woman at the beach, the one who's practically black in May! Judging by my belly skin, I used to be NW5, too.

      I can't wait to read your reviews on your RBR virgin voyage!

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  7. ahh yess beauty blunders. i see them quite frequently on myself lol i find it funny cuz i have soooo many brown shadows and i dont think they look bad on me (but then again i may be in self denial xD) and as for foundation i have exact opposite problem where most foundations are not yellow enough for me and so it turns my yellow face brown or beige which doesn't match the rest of me and makes me look oompa loompa ish. the few foundations that ARE yellow enough for me break me out so i'm still on the hunt. and when you're hunting there's bound to be some blunders so i give myself a little leeway as i explore my experimental part of makeup life and hopefully don't make too many costly mistakes xD

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    1. Isabella, don't write of brown eyeshadow just because I can't make it work! Most women look gorgeous with it on, and I guess I finally just realize I am not one of them.

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  8. I, too, have made the very same blunders.

    What i find so curious though, is how we can make the very same blunders repeatedly! I think it's in part thanks to the clever marketers; after they have finished promoting their 'universal' shades, they'll come up with something that is 'exclusively just for us' be it blue-eyed or cool-toned-chocolate-complected, or 'gracefully aging', or whatever...

    And our impulsive side lets us fall for it all over again. Looks like you have figured out the perfect marriage of impulsive (because it's fun) and intelligent ('cuz it's also fun!)

    Thanks for yet another thoughtful post!

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    1. keridaren, yes! Repeated blunders are my biggest frustration. To wit, the continual buy-try-toss brown eyeshadow and bronzer experiments. So-called universal shades make me snort as much as seeing those eyeshadow palettes for blue eyes (brown) or green eyes (purples) or brown eyes (actually brown-eyed girls do seem to have all the fun color options).

      What these suggestions rarely take into account is the hue and value of the person they're selling to. Cool skin, warm skin, medium skin, light skin, dark skin ... We all have different needs and preferences, so Oprah (who I have read is cool-toned) is NOT going to choose the same eye or lip colors that I choose. Much of my stuff wouldn't even show up on her.

      Impulsive buys are fun, and I do enjoy most of my purchases, but the fun can get a bit tarnished when I realize that exclu$ive brand isn't that much better than the stuff I already own. I get a bigger thrill when I find something awesome that didn't cost me very much money, even if I want to wrap the outsides in plain brown paper, heh. Another bummer is when I suddenly feel paralyzed by choice. Or I write a post and compare swatches, only to remember later a half dozen other items I could have compared but forgot about. My goal is to be able to not only use but locate all my makeup and remember all the names, lol.

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  9. I'm not someone who experiences much buyer's remorse - every mistake is a lesson to be learnt, right? And especially in Australia, where it is nigh impossible to return a product once you've bought it, those mistakes really tend to stick in the memory.

    One mistake that I have made repeatedly, however, relates to foundation and concealer. Whenever I buy base makeup in China, the shop assistant will almost invariably recommend and apply on you a shade that is too pale to be natural. I'm not sure if it because Asian women are obsessed with whiteness, or if the department store lighting is just that bad (which also hampers my ability to assess a good match when they test the shade on me), but I have no less than three bottles of foundation (Armani Face Architect, Helen Rubenstein, MUFE HD) at home and two concealers (MUFE, Shu Uemura) which are utterly useless. It's gotten to the stage where I will only buy foundation in China when I had already had a shade match done in Australia.

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    1. The lighter skin ideal in Asia make sense, at least as far as getting a (bad) color match.

      Being able to return makeup is rather a new thing in the US. At least I think it is because it never would have occurred to me to return something I had used. I learned that I could in Sephora a few years ago, when I was complaining to a SA about a compact that had crumbled, and she said I should return it. "But I used it," I replied.

      A makeup artist friend told me that Nordstrom (I think--if she reads this, she can correct me) was one of the first department stores to give refunds on used makeup, and she said they took EVERYTHING back, even items that the person had obviously used for many months and then decided she didn't like anymore. When stores have such liberal policies they will be abused, but makeup has such a ridiculously high markup and businesses are so desperate for our money, I guess it's worth it to them. They certainly must love all the free advertising they get from bloggers.

      I don't return makeup unless it's defective or causes an adverse reaction. I feel that if I don't like a color, that's my fault--I should have at least have tried it on in person first and/or asked for a sample. That said, some of the department store lighting is really terrible, and if I am buying something I can't see in person because it's not sold anywhere near me, and the online retailer has a 100% color guarantee, than I will return an item for a bad color match.

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  10. I think this is a great post; sometimes trusting instincts is the way to go! It's hard for me to make browns work too, and Im still trying with the ones I have. I find that rosy brown shadows are the most flattering. Golden bronzers look fine, though my true tan is more pink toned. And the palettes! They seem to get older faster than singles or duos; surprisingly the urban decay palettes i have are still going strong.

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    1. Rosy brown is an excellent color for me ... in a sweater! But I just can't seem to get brown onto my face, lol.

      And, yes, items within palettes do seem to get old fast. It's shocking to me how long it takes me to use an eyeshadow. Even one single tiny pan, like Becca, used all over the lid every day, would take a year or more to finish. I so dearly loved Prescriptives when I discovered it ages ago and could buy their Pick 2 eyeshadows, which is all I wore for years and years. Since I buy eyeshadow that matches my skin tone (meaning it goes with all my lipstick and outfits), it was never important to me to have a large selection of eyeshadow "colors." And even though I have far more eyeshadow now than I ever did back then, I still (mostly) buy those same times of subtle colors!

      If you're talking about the UD Naked palette, I can see something like that being used heavily and over a long period of time. It gives so many options. I checked the original one out but I found it to have too many warm colors and a bit too much shimmer, though I certainly could have made many of them work. I've given up on the idea, as I would have to ask my nurse to apply it to me in the nursing home because that's how long I would have it, hee.

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  11. Palettes- I only buy them if every single colour will be used- comes from 8 years of being a student and making that stipend last.

    My biggest beauty blunder would be attempts to find skin-care products that do not leave me looking like a someone has acid washed my face. Patch-testing (with an anti-histamine and emergency wipes at the ready) is how any new skin care products are selected.

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    1. I wore so little makeup as a student it hardly counts! It's hard to remember back that far, but I think I owned an eyelash curler, mascara, and Chapstick!

      Mopsy, how frustrating that your skin is so sensitive that you have to carry antihistamine wipes! My skin is much more sensitive than it used to be, but I can still use much of the skincare that does not have chemical sunscreen in it. That stuff will turn my face beet red in a heartbeat.

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    2. I think working in a lab for 8ish years has increased the sensitivity of my skin!

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  12. Expensive lessons we have to learn on our own.
    I have the same problem with yellow toned foundation too. Aparentlly everyone (I would like to see the person doing this reasearch) should look good in them.
    No! It makes me look like a corpse + my red/pink undertone will always how up through the foundation and it just looks horrible.
    Thank you clinique lady who color matched me with a pink undertone foundation :)

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    1. It is very gratifying to get a good color match, even if that color will change over time based on variables like age, oxidation, and sun damage. Carotene, hemoglobin, and melanin are the three pigments involved in skin color, but the interesting thing is that carotene, the yellow pigment, is the least common—and overly yellow skin often points to skin pathology.

      The red-hued hemoglobin is the molecule that transports oxygen throughout the body and it produces a slightly pinkish tint that is visible in light skin tones (like mine). Deoxygenated hemoglobin is more mauve in hue and produces bluish tones that are also visible in lighter skin tones. So when Px colorprinted me as a B/R, it was the hemoglobin that was most visible in my skin.

      But the main variable in our differetn skin colors is the amount, distribution, and density of melanin pigment, which produces a dark brown-black, almost purple color that intensifies when the melanin granules under the top layer of skin cells become compacted (such as when skin is exposed to sunlight), so it is interesting that MUAs point to yellow, and not beige for the universal foundation color.

      Beige with a sligthly pink undertone works great for me. Yellow foundations ... not so much.

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  13. Right with you on the bronzer, have fortunately never gone there but all that beauty blog reading does really make you wonder if you are missing a trick doesn't it, thanks for the reminder that for me it would never work! I spend hours researching even the smallest purchse, tbh its part of the fun for me, but it does also prevent too many total fails, so far at least! Great post I really enjoyed it. x

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    1. Thanks very much! And it can be hard to not want a lovely bronzer when those gorgeous compacts come out like the Spring ones by Dior and Guerlain. I will just admire them from afar and drool over the pretty pictures, because no one wants to see that brown on my face!

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  14. Hi! Would you mind sharing w/me: Are you still using Jane Iredale minerals for your foundation? Got a sample of their Golden Glow and am really trying to decide if I love it before buying. Know you've said you've used it for some time and curious if you do still love it and if not, why not? Thanks!

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    1. Hello, yes I use JI's PurePresesd powder virtually every day and have done so since ~2000, so big BIG love. ♥ In that timeframe my face has aged 12 years and has become much less oily; her minerals still work beautifully, and I don't see myself changing to anything else any time soon. Even when I "cheat" with other foundations, I always finish with her powder.

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  15. I go back and forth on so many of these issues myself. It's funny but the urge to play with sparkly things and fun colours always rears it's head again. I used to only want matte blush and now I never wear totally matte blush. I still am a glitterphobe when it comes to most products but I play every once and a while. ;-)

    I too wish my skin would fade back to it's original pasty white glory! LOL My "perfect" match is also MUFE F&B #38. I would LOVE to know what other foundations you have found close matches in. Please oh please! xoxo

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    1. PP, the only other foundations I have worn with any success over the last 10+ years are Vincent Longo Water Canvas Cream-to-Powder Foundation in Porcelain (which was unavailable for many years but has come back) and Jane Iredale PurePressed in Ivory. That's pretty much all I wear on my skin.

      I also love a glowy blush and rarely wear pure matte ones anymore. Funny how the glow I ruthlessly eradicated from my skin in my 20s and 30s I now want back! I didn't appreciate it then.

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  16. I so agree with you! I have blundered into brown lipstick, bronzers, coral blush, and vivid eye colors. I still wear my red lipsticks, but do avoid mattes as they do nothing these days but leave me looking puckered. And forget anything shimmery or frosty...all those do is eradicate the line of my lips.

    I've totally given up on liquid foundations and now stick to mineral powders for their sheerness, buildability (without cakiness) and ease of use. I've toned down my eye colors.

    I also don't do well with concealers. I've found a few that "sort of" work, but by and large, no matter how little or how much I apply, I end up with crepey undereyes and circles that still show through. I honestly look better with slightly dark circles than I do with well-concealed ones. Go figure. That hasn't stopped me from dropping wads of money on every new version that comes out, though.

    Luckily, as I age, I have learned to just accept things for what they are. My blunders are becoming less frequent, but let's face it...I'm always one impulse away from a fiasco.

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    1. Shan, your last sentence cracked me up because I so relate.

      I don't wear concealer either, I never have. Not much, anyway. By the time I thought I needed it, they'd come out with those lovely concealer/highlighter hybrids. I have Cle de Peau concealer, but that was a colossal beauty blunder. It's like wearing a mask.

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  17. Hi ZuZu. I don't know if you are still reading comments on this post but I had to try. I stumbled across your blog from a link on another blog. I almost curled up in a fetal position and cried when I read this post. But in a good way.....because I really and truly thought I was lost in space, all by myself. Every single blunder you posted I have had. And I kept thinking "what is wrong with me?" Why does bronzer make me look I tried the Lindsay Lohan method of self tanning? Why do my blue eyes look so tired with brown eyeshadow? Why does highlighter make me look like an aging drag queen? And so on. Obviously we have never met but I am a little in love with you for having the courage to stand up to the beauty blog universe and say what needed so badly to be said: all of this shiz does NOT work for everybody!!! I am 55 years old and it has taken many years and a lot of money to figure this out. At this age, shimmer and highlighter and sparkle are not our friends. Yet I read so many blogs where the writers are my age and rave about how "glowy" highlighters and shimmer make them look.
    To my eyes, it just makes women of a certain age look their age and worse, accentuates their age. But if they feel beautiful about it then my heart sings for them. I just know it doesn't look good on me. Thank you for being beautiful enough to put this out there!

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    1. Hi, Deb! What a sweet thing to say! I have to admit I laughed at "aging drag queen" comment. Been there done that! Lately, it had been coming down to a knock-down/drag-out catfight between Bette Davis and me to see who'd play Baby Jane. Not pretty.

      I don't know how much of your spare time you want to spend online, but you should come visit us at the EDB forum. We tell it like it is over there, and 99% of us are well over 40. :D

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    2. I will absolutely visit the EDB forum, thanks for the invite! I need to hear from others that tell it like it is, that will be such a refreshing change :)

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  18. mine would definitely be taupe-y eyeshadows. for years i tried perfecting a grey/black/silver smokey eye, but it always just looked terrible. i didn't realize until a few years ago that i needed to warm up my smokey eye for it to look nice on me. i'm very warm toned, and as much as i want to get taupes since everyone just loves them, i don't even bother. it's one of the two reasons i never even bothered with either of the naked palettes - they're both way too cool for me (the other reason being i'm not really big on neutral looks, so forking over the $$$ for it wouldnt be worth it).

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    1. That's so funny, both NAKED palettes are too warm for me, especially the second one. I envy women who can wear dramatic colors. When I try, the colors end up wearing me.

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  19. hey i have been trying to find a perfect foundation for my skin which has yellow based pigment and i saw your photo of four foundation swathes on your face and i love the 4th one can you please let me know the brand name and shade of it so that i can buy it . thank you :)

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  20. hey i saw your pic of 4 shades of foundation and i love the shade of the 4th foundation which has heavy yellow based pigment can please tell me the name of the brand and also the shade of the foundation . thank you :)

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    1. I am sorry, but I don't know, and it was negligent of me to not cite the source with a link in the above picture (something I usually do). I am fairly positive I found the picture via Google images, but I no longer remember the source.

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