Monday, May 7, 2012

Makeup Brushes: Helper or Hindrance?



If you are over 35 and started wearing makeup in your 20s, you'll remember that makeup brushes were not as readily available and plentiful then as they are today—certainly not good ones. Unless you were a makeup artist, or you lived in a major city with access to multiple brands, you probably made do with the tiny brushes and foam applicators that came in blush and eyeshadow compacts, as well as the thin puffs in powder compacts.

I bought my first brush set in 1992 from Chanel, but I rarely used those brushes, preferring the convenience of the "tools" that came packaged in my makeup compacts. In fact, I used to regularly request extra foam eyeshadow applicators at the Prescriptives counter because I knew I'd eventually wear out the ones that came with my Pick-2 eyeshadow compact.

As I continued to read fashion and style magazines, I took note of the makeup brushes that magazine editors and beauty gurus liked and stored that information in the back of my mind. At Henri Bendel in 1996, I bought a MAC #143 angle eyeshadow brush (squirrel) and a #135 blush brush (goat). I never used the blush brush, but the 143 was used nearly every day.

A year or so later, at Bloomingdale's, I had the temerity to wander around the ground floor without much purpose. A Bobbi Brown sales associate pounced on me and gave me a makeover. I loathed the brown-based/warm makeup she used, but I bought three brushes, an eye shader, blender, and eyeliner. All three were stamped with Essentials on the handle, a handle much longer than BB brushes sold today. I occasionally used the shader brush, but I never cared for the other two. At the time, I continued using a combination of foam applicators for the entire lid and the MAC 143 in the crease. Being naturally rosy, I almost never wore blush.

Shortly before Y2K, I bought my first sable good brush: the Shu Uemura #10 Natural eyeshadow brush made of Kolinsky sable.


I loved its silky springiness. In fact, I liked it so much I bought an additional two #10s in the travel size, and I used those, along with the MAC 143 exclusively. As hard as it might be to believe, I wore a grand total of two eyeshadows back then, so the MAC and Shu brushes served my needs.

But time passed and Makeup Alley and blogs came along. I read reviews and started picking up a brush here and there until I suddenly had too many brushes to use every day. And many of the brushes I purchased did the exact same thing as its sister.


Suddenly, these helpful precision tools felt more like a hindrance. I was more a curious consumer than a true curator, and I felt overwhelmed by the choices and bemused that so many were never used. When a lipstick doesn't work, I toss it into the trash without regret, but a brush is an investment. People don't throw away investments. At the same time, I'd roll my eyes at myself when I remembered how the average cosmetics-loving woman managed to get by for decades without a brush for every conceivable task on her face. Seriously. Time for a purge.

I started paying attention to the makeup I used every day, especially the types of tasks I was performing with or without brushes. I quickly realized there were brushes I rarely reached for and others I actually disliked:
  • Paddle-type foundation brushes. They soak up too much product, leave streaks (unless I want to take the extra time to tap tap tap with the sides), and require daily washing. No thanks. If I wear liquid foundation, I'll use my fingers, just like I've done for the majority of my adult life. Hate them. Next.
  • Cream eyeshadow/primer brushes. Unless you're really goo averse, these are just another thing to wash every day, when my fingertips work just as well. Yes, I have to wash my fingers, but I don't have to perch my hands on the top of the sink and wait all day for them to dry, either.
I decided to give my brushes a hard look and see which ones I couldn't live without. Here are the results:

A thin angle brush. Although I don't use it every day (sometimes grabbing a pencil), I could never do without a thin angle brush for applying eyeliner and/or brow color. The bristles must be firm yet springy and thin enough for precision. My two favorites are by Paula Dorf and Bobbi Brown.



An eyeshadow sweep brush. For applying pigment to the entire lid, I love the Hakuhodo B532BkSL eyeshadow brush. Its round, flat, paddle-shaped brush covers my large lids with one or two sweeps. The exquisitely soft blue squirrel bristles allow for a quick sheer wash, or I can build up the color. I use it exclusively for matte or satin eyeshadow just about every day.


An application brush. For patting pigment onto the moveable lid, I have two favorites. The MAC 239 can't be beat, period. I use it for all eyeshadow finishes, including pressing shimmer into the inner corners of the eyes. It's dense, small, and I adore it. I also still love the Shu Uemura #10 Natural eyeshadow brush. It's springy hairs are brilliant for diffusing shimmer eyeshadow, and I can use its firm edge for brow highlight, obviating the need for yet another (pencil) brush.

 

Crease work. After making messes with the Laura Mercier Smudge Brush and Hakuhodo S113, I rediscovered the Laura Mercier Angled Eye Colour Brush. I dip the point into matte pigment and do the windshield-wiper thing, stopping at the center of my lid. Then I use the flat side to diffuse the color upward. LOVE it.


Blender brush. After the Bobbi Brown Blender Brush and Hakuhodo S142 went to brush heaven for being too floppy and soft, I found myself still loving the Edward Bess Luxury Eye Brush (reviewed here). Though I would not do it regularly (muddy the colors) I could take this ONE brush on a trip for base and contour. It's also one of the few brushes I own where the handle is metal instead of wood.


Tightlining. Nothing, and I do mean nothing, beats the Hakuhodo K005 Eye Shadow Brush for lining the eye. The uncut weasel hairs are as perfect for pressing powder into the lash line from above as they are from wiggling gel liner into the roots from below. At $15, it's half the cost of the Hakuhodo Kokutan Eye Shadow Brush SL (H2295) with the exact same brush head and cheaper than most MAC brushes.


Powder foundation.  Newly in love with the quality of uncut Hakuhodo brushes, I tried their maple-handled G527 powder brush, but I did not love it. I still prefer the Jane Iredale Handi brush that I have been using since 2000. It applies my holy-grail Jane Iredale PurePressed foundation (reviewed here) in seconds, and the bristles never irritate my skin. Like the G527, the shorter handle is made of maple, and I would not be surprised to discover that JI is outsourcing brush manufacture to Japan. One sweep across the pan picks up the perfect amount of powder, and despite daily use and hundreds of washes, it looks as good as the day I purchased it ten years ago.


Blush brush. Despite its cult status, I did not love the Suqqu Cheek Brush. Yes, it's unbearably soft ... and therein lies the problem. The hairs splay and have almost no control. For brush application, I prefer the MAC 188. The silky-yet-firm duo fiber bristles are outstanding for applying powder, cream, and liquid. I use the 188 for blush, highlighter, and finishing powder, including HD.


Bye bye Suqqu, it was nice to know you

Travel brush. The Hakuhodo H501 Slide Face Brush is made of springy goat, and it's great for both powder foundation and blush. That the brush retracts into its own case is very convenient, as I can sweep the tips into pigment and slide it home for later use (meaning I don't have to carry a compact with me.) The plastic is soft and gets scratched easily.


Lips. For lip color application, I use either the brush end of a Chanel lip pencil or the travel Becca Lip Brush, but unless the color is very pigmented, I tend to apply lipstick straight from the tube.

Unless you are a brush curator, do you think there are too many choices nowadays or are you of the opinion that you can never have too many brushes? What are the brushes you can't live without?

43 comments:

  1. I have to agree with you, brushes have become "the thing" these days, but I find that my make up skills have improved since I started using them. At first I bought a few from MAC of which I have only kept the 239,217 and 219. Then as I started getting more and more into make up I tried to understand the needs I had and imagine what sort of brush would help me achieve the result I want as far as shape, texture, even handle-size was concerned ( I m short sighted and find smaller handles better as I cn get closer to the mirror) and then looked around to find them. Shu Uemura no10 is a fantastic brush and so is the no12 (natural hair). Shu Uemura cheek brushes have been such helpful tools in learning to apply blusher. My only regret with them is that my large Shu uemura goat hair powder brush (no27 I think) has grown harder and I can't use it any more. I know have quite a few eye brushes (haven't counted them lately but I need 2 glasses to store them) that do a similar thing, but I usually use them only once and put them aside and wash all of them at the end of the week.

    Youtube and blogs can lead you very astray, especially since it's not that easy to have access to certain brushes like Hakuhodo and Suqqu or to try brushes yourself and you have to trust in others'opinions. What works for one person though, may not work for the other. I do believe they make a difference, but one has to understand that they are tools and in order to use a tool you need a skill. A brush is not a miracle worker in itself, but the more you work and understand them, the more you can enjoy them.

    The ones I can't live without are the MAC 217, Rose of Versailles eyeliner brush, Shu Uemura 10,12,14H, 16R, 17 a few from the Aya Takano collection and my Kanebo powder brushes. I have yet to find an ideal small smudging brush and a foundation one. I did try a few from Suqqu and will buy them eventually, but they were way over my budget when I was in London last year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I still have my MAC 239, 217, 219, 242, and 187. The 217 really is a workhorse, and few have matced it, though it MAC could make it a little softer, I'd buy backups after backups.

      I also like the shorter handles. I am getting farsighted, as well, so I appreciate being able to lean in, but even when my eyesight was perfect, I never did love those long handles of the original BB brushes. They seem more like an artist's paintbrush than a makeup brush (which is what one of my artistic friends buys from the art store on the cheap).

      I had never before heard of Rose of Versailles so I looked it up and saw that Creer Beaute appears to be a Japanese brand. I wish I hadn't looked!

      As for smudge brush, I assume you have looked at and ruled out NARS and Laura Mercier. Have yo considered something like the Hakuhodo K005? It's a little longer than the typical stubby smudge brush, but it's a real multi-tasker, and because it's weasel, it handles both cream/gel and powder ... and it's cheap. I think it's around $15. If I had not "discovered" Hakuhodo, I would have continued with Shu, but it's a shame we can't see Shu brushes in person anymore. I really miss their boutique on Newbury Street.

      Laughably, my skills have not improved much since my days of minimal makeup. I do wear several products each day, all over my face, but it all blends in so subtly, and I never managed to master the beautiful multi shades of eyeshadow technique where there are gradations of color.

      Delete
  2. A lot of the brushes I own came in starter kits that I bought several years ago. Looking back I've realized they are a bit scratchy. I loved them at the time, but they haven't aged well. The thought of having to replace brushes that I've used everyday for the past five years kind of terrifies me. It's mainly the kabuki and BE "flawless face" brush that I'm not sure how to replace. I've been procrastinating for months because there are so many choices!

    Is there a kabuki type brush (for mineral makeup use) that is on the larger side (~2in?) that you would recommend? I prefer my face brushes to be big; I think it goof proofs even coverage for me. Or maybe I just have a big face :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alima Pure makes a good kabuki brush. Very soft, dense and large. It's the #25 Foundation Brush. The Bare Essentials Full Flawless Face brush is pretty large as well, but it's not as dense and I find it a bit scratchy.

      Delete
    2. I like a big buki, too. ;) I don't have a ruler nearby, but the Hakuhodo G527 I mentioned above spans the length of my index finger right up to my second knuckle. The Jane Iredale Handi is about 1/3 inch less wide and almost 1/2 inch longer, but it's not floppy. I had used that brush every single day (except the days it was drying from its bath) for 10 years, and it's still one of the best powder brushes I have ever used. Oh, wait--those are flat-topped kabukis ... is that what you wanted? I like them because they deposit the perfect amount of color and then I can swirl it in. I find the round-topped kabukis waste more product because they don't deposit much on my skin unless I apply using the sides. I've been using the JI brush so long, I never considered switching teams to the round side. Both of those brushes are extremely soft and both have gotten softer with use. I don't know where you are located, but dermstore.com sells JI and has free shipping.

      Delete
    3. The Alima 25 is excellent, but that's the brush I have that takes forevah to dry! It is sooooo dense! But, boy, does it pick up powder and put it down gently.

      Delete
    4. Oooh thanks for all of the ideas! I'm currently using a rounded top kabuki, but I'm not that happy with it; there does seem to be a lot of waste. That and it's shedding like my cat in June.

      Now I just have to decide on one...or buy them all and begin my brush hoarding hehe. *goes and counts brushes* Or maybe just continue to hoard; I have 20 brushes just for use on the eye area, but only 5 for the rest of the face. Of those five, four were free in a starting kit and are now falling apart. *sigh* I can't throw them away though...

      I agree about the BE flawless face, I love it for light coverage, but don't appreciate the scratchiness (and now shedding). Is there a brush comparable to it that is perhaps a bit higher in quality?

      Delete
    5. Until recently, all but one brush (one I never used) were for eyes. Crazy but true.

      Delete
  3. I am covered in brush shame! Covered, I tell you. I just went and counted my brushes. I refuse to admit to how many I have; let's just say the total falls into the ridiculous. And I never even thought about it until I read this post. I'm sitting here scratching my head wondering when and how did I go so far off the rails with brushes. And I have no idea!! And I don't use most of them because I have duplicates and I don't even know what some of them are really for. How crazy is that? Brush shame....I'm hanging my head.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Excellent post!
      I don't even dare count my brushes. Although I certainly don't need/love them all, how would I ever have found the ones I Really DO love & adore & use on a regular basis if I hadn't got them all to experiment with? I just don't have access to stores that carry the brands I want to try so I have to order on a trial & error basis. Of course I wouldn't even be aware of half these brands if it weren't for all the helpful Blogs out there:))
      When I'm having a stressful day or have computer-tired eyes I also use my super soft brushes to stroke away the stress. It works wonders on my kids too!

      Delete
    2. Deb, I have brush shame, too. Major. The moment I got home from work, I counted mine, and let's just say my estimate was not too conservative. We should all get together and have a brush piñata party!

      Delete
    3. Buggsiebee, I ordered many of my brushes sight unseen, too! Which is craziness. OK, so I have access to all the major brands at department stores, but ordering that blasted Suqqu from Scotland was a big risk, thankfully one that paid off. I'm consoling myself right this moment with its kitten-whisker brush head while I hang my own head in shame.

      Delete
  4. Zuzu, how do you know what's going on in my head? :) I was just thinking this weekend that I have to get rid of some brushes that are sitting there and I hate using.
    I have one blush brush that is about 20 years old now! It was my first real brush. It's so foreign now to think I used to just use what came in the packaging, but I did. I now have duplicates of mostly eye bushes, but some of the face ones I have I never use anymore. Must purge.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Have you ever thrown a brush away? The thought of that just traumatizes me. I think I tossed a Sigma brush, but I instantly regretted it. I didn't have the heart to dig it out of the gross coffee grounds, even though I realized later I could have washed it, lol.

      At last year's blog sale, I sold that MAC 135 to a woman in Holland. She had never heard of 135 and wanted to know that it was genuine. I couldn't prove its pedigree, but I did mention the store and the approximate date of the purchase. ;D

      Yep, time to purge. I have a crap-ton set aside for the upcoming sale, but now I think I need to get more ruthless because what remains ... let's just say it's over 50. Insanity!! I need a Greek god to transform me into the Lernaean Hydra so I can get some use out of all this stuff.

      Delete
  5. I really think this started with the MAC "doctrine" that all makeup must be applied with brushes, and that a different brush is needed for each product/application. Very convenient for MAC and the Lauder Group, but it's nonsense. Brilliant makeup artists like Dick Page, Ellis Faas use their fingers more than brushes.
    Then Youtube "gurus" and bloggers spread the message, and now it's considered lazy and even "not hygienic" to use fingers. How in the world is a brush full of dust, bacteria, old skin cells etc. more hygienic than freshly washed hands? (Assuming that people don't wash powder product brushes after each use, and most do not, I would wager.)
    You have a lot more brushes than I do; I'm happy with the few I have, and do actually use them. And wash them regularly, which is easier to do when there are only a few, lol.
    As you say, accumulating dozens is just pointless clutter. Thank you for the interesting, intelligent beauty blog - your point of view is always worth reading and thinking about.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you very much. :)

      Was it really MAC? Hmm. Makes sense, and I agree--smart business move, especially now that MAC is such a huge cult brand. That said, I have found that I can use one brush to apply three different colors to my eyes (base, lid, crease), if I swipe the brush head on a microfiber cloth in between, but even still, since I am using colors whose shades are not that far off from one another, it all blends together anyway!

      As for fingers being unhygienic. Pppht. I watch Lisa Eldridge use fingers on herself AND her models. And since I apply my makeup fresh from the shower, my hands don't get any cleaner than that.

      Yeah ... you don't envy me my brush-washing night. ;) That said, when you have as many as I do, you can go months in between bath night!

      Delete
  6. I have decided to buy only synthetic brushes so my brush buying was then naturally trimmed down. IT Cosmetics and Sigmax brushes are the only companies that WOW me with their synthetic brushes so I often indulge when they release new ones.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have not tried either of those brands, but I hear good things.

      My favorite synthetics are by Alima (one which which take days to dry!) and the Make Up For Ever kabuki, which is the softest thing on earth. I have heard fantastic things about Sam Chapman's brushes, but I have never seen them. I think they're sold at Ulta only, and I don't have one near me.

      Delete
  7. I'm a make up neophyte and my first few brushes are from MAC but what I love the most out of my very few brushes would be Bobbi Brown Concealer Blending brush!!! I can't make my under eye concealer blend so perfectly without it! I'm taking notes of those brushes you've mentioned! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lucky you that you have found a good concealer brush! I don't love my paddle-type concealer brushes, which streak. I wear liquid concealer/highlighter hybrids (YSL or Ellis Faas or Estee Lauder), so I like to apply a dot under my eyes, and then use the synthetic tips of the Laura Mercier Finishing Brush to blend it out. It looks airbrushed. Bu usually, I swipe the YSL Touche Eclat straight onto my skin from its applicator brush and then blend with my fingers because I am lazy lazy lazy and hate hate hate washing brushes. :)

      That said, when I do use regular concealers, my favorite concealer brush is the Jane Iredale. I've had it for around 12 years, and it's a good one.

      Delete
  8. imo, that's kinda hard to answer. back in the days MAC was THE brush company. everyone wanted it and loved it. nowadays, we have amazing japanese brushes availble worldwide and it has become more of a luxury itslef - to have a high quality brush. it doesn't have to be only convinient but made of high quality hair and wood (handle). I think, brushes have become a collector thing more than ever (western world in general I think). I love all the japanese manufacturers and really enjoy having a well made brush.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree completely. Although I like many of my basic goat brushes, my Japanese brushes are my prized possessions. They are such a pleasure to use, and I love that the ends are not cut, which is what makes them so soft.

      Delete
  9. You know, these days when I read your posts I often think of the film Avatar. It's like you inhabit my brain!! I was looking at the brushes I keep in my bathroom yesterday and was horrified that many of them are collecting dust, LITERALLY!! I adore buying brushes as I know they won't go 'off' unlike makeup will eventually but I'm often aware that much of the makeup I wear daily is cream based, for convenience, and I generally prefer to apply it by hand.

    For me the brushes aren't a hindrance but I can admit that I don't need any more. Plus, for some eyeshadows, nothing works better than the sponge applicators they come with. I'm sitting here waiting to be engulfed by flames!!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. *snort!* I hope not, Jane. Who would be my sekrit internet twin? Tracy would have to step in, and her skin is warm, so we can't have that!

      I go through phases when I wear cream versus powder. I do have my eyes on those new Ellis Faas colors, so I'll probably be heading back into cream/liquid territory soon.

      Delete
  10. I'm not a brush curator, but I do have quite a few. However, I try to keep each purchase original, not just a copy of something I already have. I have foundation, blush, and powder brushes (but only 1, possibly 2 of each), as well as 2 good "sweep" eyeshadow brushes, 2 different "crease" brushes, and 2 eyeliner brushes, one for a thin line and one for a thicker line. And I have a dual-ended eyebrow brush with a spoolie on one end and a stiff angle on the other.

    Brushes (along with blush) are one of the things I really do exercise restraint with. First off, they take up a lot of space that I'd rather devote to makeup and skin care. Second, as you noted, they require a lot of upkeep with all the washing. I just don't see the point in having a full quiver of brushes. Sadly, the same can't be said for my opinion on the necessity of choice in lipsticks, foundations, or mascaras.

    Although I don't have a ton of brushes, I have to say they've made a HUGE difference in my application techniques, and I find them to be a major time-saver. They allow products to blend more easily and quickly and it's easier to control the amount of product I use. That being said, on any given day...I just use my fingers for everything. This morning I used 1 brush...powder. Eyes, cheeks and face were done with my hands. Go figure.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I honestly don't know how and when I acquired so many, Shan. I should sit down with the lot of them and think about their provenance. ;) Or in my case, more like chain of evidence!

      I admire your restraint. I intend to unburden myself and be happy with the few I reach for every day with maybe a few special-needs brushes waiting in a drawer. Somehow I transferred my lipsick "thing" for brushes and eyeshadow. No idea how that happened.

      A "quiver full" lolol

      Delete
    2. I so agree with you. I used to live with sponge tip applicator only for 2-3 years. And I found that the eyeshadow blending brush really changed my life.

      Delete
  11. Yet another fascinating post to chew over, Zuzu!

    Brushes are a makeup thing I'm both extravagant and unsentimental about -- having jumped through fiery hoops to acquire my first Chikuhodos and some Japan-exclusive Hakuhodos last year I had absolutely no problem selling/swapping the ones I wasn't reaching for six months later.

    I do keep quite a few brushes around (enough to raise eyebrows at the claim that I'm not a curator anyway) but it's because
    1. I don't like to repeat the same products look within a week so a stock clean brushes are necessary
    2. I use brushes/tools for EVERYTHING; my fingers are hilariously inept and my measly features need the precision

    I share your love for the Shu N10 and Suqqu Cheek -- those would make my desert island list for sure. Sometimes I toy with the idea of editing down to a 'daily' kit of all stars with no overlap in function but for HOW I WEAR MAKEUP a minimalist brush collection would be the height of pretentious impracticality. Ultimately, brushes are tools, very much subordinate to the products they apply.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "Ultimately, brushes are tools, very much subordinate to the products they apply." How very true that is. Sad but true, considering the investment for some of them, but then again, I hope my Suqqu will last 20 years with excellent care, when I'll have gone through countless pans of blush in that same timeframe.

      I really applaud you, Kate, as well as the rest of you who know so well your features and the tasks you want the brushes to perform. I guess I will never be much more than a brush hack, and so I keep fumbling along.

      I wish I could be more ruthless with the brushes I never use. I still have 2 of the 4 brushes I purchased at that Chanel counter 20 years ago, and I never ever use them. Those deserve to hit the bin bag!

      Delete
  12. I stopped buying every brush I wanted, after shamefully throwing away 1 1/2pounds of brushes in weight, I just had to up my skills or just throw everything out and start all over. My best brush has been my Shu 6M which I use as a lip brush. It has been with me since the middle 80's and is still going strong. My first brush set and those brushes were hard to find in the early 80's were Jerome Alexander.

    My faves at the moment are my Ve Neill ones, great quality as in how pro brushes should be made. They withstand a good dip in alcohol (yes, they like to get drunk), they can take a lickin' and keep on tickin'...wait that is Timex. Anyway, you know what I mean.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Give your brushes some K+! But 1.5 pounds? That must have hurt. Or it was very liberating. Maybe I should just do it, too. Otherwise they are just taking up sad space, so what's worse?

      I am happy to hear that the Shu brushes are long lasting. My bristles are as beautiful as ever, but I think I detect the slightest wiggle in the ferrule, and that makes me nervous. I assume if that comes truly loose, all is lost. I have never seen how the hairs are attached beneath it. Hmmm, maybe I should perform exploratory surgery on one of the unloveds.

      Delete
  13. I disagree about the paddle brushes for foundation. I love them, having just discovered the technique. I love them for one simple reason: I can get away with wearing so much less foundation, with a greater accuracy. My face feels 10 lbs younger, if you know what I mean.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 10 pounds younger! What brush are you using, L? I have a paddle brush by Prescriptives (which gets a lot of love) and one by Jane Iredale. I also have a Becca Cream Blush brush that I could use for liquid foundation if I wanted. It's a little shorter so not as floppy.

      I think I am just a hopeless brush person. I see all those YouTubers applying their foundation with a brush, like Lisa Eldridge (when she's not using her fingers) and I always feel like I am missing something. Maybe it's my brush. But probably not.

      Delete
  14. Fantastic post! While I realize that this should cause me to shop my stash of brushes-- I find myself really wanting a few of those Hakuhodo's that you discussed (that have been on my must-have list for a while)! :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Now is probably not a good time to admit I did a bad bad thing at a certain Japanese company. *eek*

      Delete
    2. Ooooooooooooooh- shrieking with joy coupled with a short coffee spew at my monitor!! What is it that you ordered, my dear friend-- and do I need to get it too?!

      Delete
    3. Ummmm, it starts with S and ends in u. ;) Their large eye shader brush. Reviews (check out Front Row Beauty) say it's as soft as the cheek brush and does a phenomenal job at softly diffusing shimmer product—not a laydown brush by any means, but given my love of soft and natural eyeshadow, it seemed like a logical choice. It would also be a great brush for loose pigment, I think.

      Do you need it? I will have to let you know. ;) I paid for the faster shipping with delivery confirmation. It's an investment, after all! lol

      Delete
    4. Oooooooooooh, I can't wait to hear about it! xo, Lola

      Delete
  15. I agree wholeheartedly. I have to wash all of these brushes, you know? (Which I still do so very rarely. Eep. Is it Wet Ones that everyone uses to just wipe down their brushes daily? I should probably invest in Costco-sized packages of that!) I use my fingers for foundation for the same reason as you - I can wash my hands much more easily than brushes. I use a few eye brushes, two brow brushes (one to comb through and one to shade - an angled one like yours), and then a blush brush, sometimes a contoured brush. I think it's nice to have options to use with our various products (some are more appropriate than others at a given time), but they don't all need to come out at once, you know?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Larie, like you, I store my least-use brushes away, and I am also probably one of the few who washes her brushes rarely. I don't mix a lot of different colors (my eyeshadow repertoire is rather small), so after I am done, I flick the brush head with my fingers and watch the color dust fly, and then I wipe the it across a latex wedge or over a microfiber towel. I have been doing that for years with no ill effects, and I was extremely pleased when the instructions from Hakuhodo said to wash your brushes as little as possible. I never use those quick-drying cleansers because they contain alcohol.

      Some brushes get washed more than others (like my face kabuki), but I doubt I wash my eyeshadow brushes more than once every 3 months.

      Delete
  16. Oh yes, the internet got me amassing brushes too! I have full sets from Sonia Kashuk, e.l.f, Bdellium Tools, and a good number from MAC, and EcoTools. I have so many blush brushes... ...

    Of which, I find that I need a good flat top kabuki brush for loose powder, a blending brush from EcoTools, an angled liner brush for brow and eyeliner, an eyeshadow packing brush in two sizes, a lip brush, and a pencil brush. That's really all. And perhaps a tiny concealer brush.

    ReplyDelete
  17. I love your bruh organizer.... where is it from? :D

    ReplyDelete

I love reading your comments! If you have a specific question or request, please feel free to e-mail me directly. Comments that contain advertising links or shameless plugs will not be published.